President Donald Trump speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Thursday, April 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

President Donald Trump at Thursday’s coronavirus press briefing.

Associated Press

The White House press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, accused the news media of taking President Donald Trump’s comments on Thursday — when he suggested Americans might be able to inject disinfectant into their bodies to cure coronavirus infections — out of context.

“President Trump has repeatedly said that Americans should consult with medical doctors regarding coronavirus treatment, a point that he emphasized again during yesterdays’ briefing,” McEnany said in a statement.

“Leave it to the media to irresponsibly take President Trump out of context and run with negative headlines,” she added.

Trump’s statements were broadcast in their entirety on live television. Insider has included a transcript of his remarks below.

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The White House press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, on Friday said the news media had taken President Donald Trump’s statements on Thursday — when he said the US should investigate whether injecting disinfectant into people’s bodies might cure COVID-19 — out of context to run negative stories.

“President Trump has repeatedly said that Americans should consult with medical doctors regarding coronavirus treatment, a point that he emphasized again during yesterdays’ briefing,” McEnany said in a statement. “Leave it to the media to irresponsibly take President Trump out of context and run with negative headlines.”

Related Video: How Dr. Fauci Became the Nation’s Top Disease Expert

Here’s what Trump said during Thursday’s coronavirus briefing, which was aired on live television:

“I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in a minute — one minute — and is there a way we can do something like that by injection inside, or almost a cleaning? Because you see it gets in the lungs, and it does a tremendous number on the lungs. So it’d be interesting to check that. So you’re going to have to use medical doctors with — but it sounds interesting to me.”

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And here’s what he said about using different types of light to treat coronavirus, backing his musings up with the unproven theory that warmer weather could mitigate the effects of the virus:

“So, supposing we hit the body with a tremendous — whether it’s ultraviolet, or just very powerful — light. And I think you said that hasn’t been checked, but you’re going to test it. And then I said, supposing you brought the light inside the body, which you can do either through the skin or in some other way. And I think you’re going to test that, too … But we’ll see the whole concept with the light where it goes in in one minute, that’s pretty powerful.”

Trump pressed Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, on whether “the heat and the light” had been used to treat viruses.

“Not as a treatment,” Birx said. “I mean, certainly, fever — is a good thing. When you have a fever, it helps your body respond. But not as — I’ve not seen heat or light.”

Reckitt Benckiser, the British company that manufactures Lysol, put out a statement Friday disputing Trump’s claim and warning against the “internal administration” of disinfectant.

“As a global leader in health and hygiene products, we must be clear that under no circumstance should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body (through injection, ingestion or any other route),” the statement said, citing “recent speculation and social media activity.”

“As with all products, our disinfectant and hygiene products should only be used as intended and in line with usage guidelines,” the statement added. “Please read the label and safety information.”

The American Cleaning Institute also put out its own press release Friday “in response to speculation about the use of disinfectants in or on one’s body.”

“Disinfectants are meant to kill germs or viruses on hard surfaces,” the statement said. “Under no circumstances should they ever be used on one’s skin, ingested or injected internally. We remind everyone to please use all hygiene, cleaning and disinfecting products as directed in order to ensure safe, effective and intended use of those products.”

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